Doctors Failing to Treat Certain Heart Patients?

Doctors Failing to Treat Certain Heart Patients?

When Missourians have a serious medical condition, they want to know about the different treatment options that are available to them. They want information about the surgeons and the procedures that need to be performed. They will also look at success rates, to determine which facility will best allow them to completely recover.

Recently, a new study examined what happens at medical facilities that experienced a high number of patient losses. These facilities are seemingly providing a different level of care to patients deemed to be at the highest risk, and some of these diagnosis failures may be preventing patients from receiving the procedures that are necessary to save their lives.

The study, by doctors with Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, took a closer look at the decisions that doctors made when deciding to treat individuals with heart problems. The research disclosed that at hospitals that had high death rates, the most seriously ill patients would often not be treated.

In many cases, these patients needed stents to remove the blockage in arteries. If the patient was deemed to have a low survivability rate, these hospitals would not perform the operations.

The research is concerning to some, as it leads to some individuals not getting the care that they need. The actual patient, and the factors present in the individual, are seemingly less important than the raw data. In many instances, it is uncertain the actual effect the surgeries will have until after they have been performed. By not completing the procedures, patients may see their conditions worsen.

Those individuals who have been injured due to a physician’s negligence should speak to an experienced attorney about their claims. These cases will require extensive analysis to learn more about the role that the treatment played in creating these injuries.

Source: Reuters, “Docs may cherry-pick cases after death rate reports,” Andrew M. Seaman, June 20, 2013

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